The ECSC and the creation of the European Community

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After the war, the ECSC, the European Coal and Steel Community, was formed in order to strengthen Franco-German cooperation and thus avoid a new war in Europe.

75 years of peace… unheard of in Europe!

At the end of the Second World War, many people were determined to create the political conditions for collaboration between France and Germany. The goal was to avoid a new war on the continent in the future.

Thus, on May 9, 1950, Robert Schuman, French Minister of Foreign Affairs, proposed the creation of a European organization. This organization would pool French and German coal and steel production, two of the leading industries of the time. The main idea was to make war “not only unthinkable but also materially impossible.”

The organization was inspired by Jean Monnet, the first commissioner for planning. This founding text in the history of European construction led to the signing of the Treaty of Paris on April 18, 1951. It founded the European Coal and Steel Community between six European states (France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Belgium, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands).

Conference of creation of the BENELUX in The Hague in February 1958.
Conference of creation of the BENELUX in The Hague in February 1958.
Pact of Brussels. Speech by Paul-Henri Spaak on March 17, 1948.
Pact of Brussels. Speech by Paul-Henri Spaak on March 17, 1948.
Signature on April 18, 1951 of the treaty establishing the ECSC (European Coal and Steel Community) in the Salon de l'Horloge (Quai d'Orsay) where Robert Schuman, French Minister of Foreign Affairs, holds the treaty.
Signature on April 18, 1951 of the treaty establishing the ECSC (European Coal and Steel Community) in the Salon de l’Horloge (Quai d’Orsay) where Robert Schuman, French Minister of Foreign Affairs, holds the treaty.

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